Flooding in Myanmar: Handicap International specialists sent to help local organisations

  • Emergency
  • Myanmar

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This photo of residents in the village of Kun Thee Chaung was taken during previous flooding, caused by Cyclone Nargis in 2008. Myanmar.
This photo of residents in the village of Kun Thee Chaung was taken during previous flooding, caused by Cyclone Nargis in 2008. Myanmar.
This photo of residents in the village of Kun Thee Chaung was taken during previous flooding, caused by Cyclone Nargis in 2008. Myanmar.

Two humanitarian emergency response specialists have been dispatched to Burma (Myanmar) where one million people have been affected by flooding in 12 of the country’s 14 states. Their mission will be to support the efforts already being made by disabled people’s organisations to identify the needs of the most vulnerable victims and to ensure they are included in the current humanitarian aid effort. Below, one of these specialists, logistics officer Philippe Mazard, describes the remarkable work being done by these organisations.

“Civil society groups launched an immediate response to the disaster,” explains Philippe a few hours before he left for the region. “As the humanitarian aid effort gets under way, all organisations which are able to help are doing so. We naturally wanted to support the incredible work begun by civil society in Burma and to benefit them with our experience of this type of situation.”

Handicap International was present in Burma (Myanmar) before the disaster struck and has been working in partnership with the same disabled people’s organisations which are now involved in the humanitarian operations. “These organisations are in the best position to ensure that the most vulnerable people, particularly people with disabilities, are included in the humanitarian aid effort,” continues Philippe.

“That’s why we’ve decided to lend them our support by putting our technical skills at their disposal. Once I arrive in the field, my role will be to help them overcome any logistical problems they may encounter. We will also provide them with technical tools to maximise the effectiveness of their assessments, which should make a big difference when it comes to including the most vulnerable people in the humanitarian aid effort now getting underway.

Published 13/08/15

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