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Philippines

The Philippines archipelago is one of the most vulnerable regions on the planet in terms of natural disasters, especially typhoons. Handicap International works alongside the most vulnerable populations to help them prepare for risks, and provide emergency relief in the event of a disaster. The organisation also campaigns to improve the consideration given to disability and the inclusion of people with disabilities in society.

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The Philippines archipelago is one of the most vulnerable regions on the planet in terms of natural disasters, especially typhoons. Handicap International works alongside the most vulnerable populations to help them prepare for risks, and provide emergency relief in the event of a disaster. The organisation also campaigns to improve the consideration given to disability and the inclusion of people with disabilities in society.
The Philippines archipelago is one of the most vulnerable regions on the planet in terms of natural disasters, especially typhoons. Handicap International works alongside the most vulnerable populations to help them prepare for risks, and provide emergency relief in the event of a disaster. The organisation also campaigns to improve the consideration given to disability and the inclusion of people with disabilities in society.

Our actions

Since 1985, Handicap International has worked in the most poverty-stricken areas of the Philippines. The organisation runs projects aimed at preventing disabilities and reducing the risks of natural disasters, which frequently hit the country.

To prevent and reduce the impact of natural disasters on the population (death, injuries, material damage or loss of income), the organisation encourages the authorities to draw up contingency and evacuation plans which specifically take people with disabilities into account. The organisation regularly mobilises its emergency response teams in the wake of cyclones, volcanic eruptions or floods that regularly strike the country.

Following Typhoon Haiyan in 2013, the most violent typhoon ever recorded, Handicap International launched an emergency response intervention in the provinces of Leyte and Capiz. The organisation’s teams deployed a logistics platform to help ensure humanitarian aid could reach the most isolated areas. They also distributed 1,390 tents to people whose homes had been destroyed, and supported the process to rebuild shelters for 900 households. Handicap International also worked in 50 Child Friendly Spaces to further the inclusion of vulnerable children and supported 774 households that had lost their source of income.

Today, the organisation is still helping 700 highly vulnerable households  affected by the typhoon, by providing them with financial and technical assistance, so that they can rebuild homes that are safer and better able to withstand natural disasters.

Handicap International also runs a cardiovascular disease (CVD) programme and a diabetes care programme in the Davao region with the aim of preventing the onset of disabilities. For example, the organisation is improving diabetes foot care services within the Davao health care system, by training professionals and supplying equipment. The organisation is also taking steps to raise the awareness of diabetes sufferers regarding the existing care options already on offer. It also runs a project to extend the public CVD scheme to new areas.

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Change a life

Background

The combined impact of poverty and recurrent natural disasters including typhoons, means that entire communities in the Philippines struggle to survive.

Located in South-East Asia, the Philippines archipelago is one of the most vulnerable regions on the planet in terms of natural disasters. Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occasionally cause substantial losses and extensive damage. Typhoons are very frequent and their secondary effects – landslides, flooding and flash floods – are devastating. They strike populations with violent force: Typhoon Haiyan hit the country in November 2013 and left 8,000 people dead, 4 million displaced persons, and 15 million affected in some way by the disaster. During the two decades that preceded Typhoon Haiyan, natural disasters had already killed more than 31,000 persons and affected 98 million people in the Philippines, and more typhoons continue to hit the country.

As in many developing countries, non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease also pose a serious threat and are one of the causes of disabilities in the population.

In the Philippines, poverty is not just a rural phenomenon. There are major inequalities between different regions and socio-economic groups. The poorest provinces are those of Visayas and Mindanao, but poverty is also very acute in the southern regions of Luzon.

The Philippines has ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Legislative measures have been adopted since 1982 and a major law to protect people with disabilities was introduced in 1992. It emphasises their right to participate fully in society and to access training and employment, education, health and social services and public transport on an egalitarian basis.

Key figures Philippines - Handicap International
Key figures Philippines - Handicap International
WHERE your support HELPS

Partners

  • Increasing access to multidisciplinary diabetes care (CVD Project)

    • Department of Health – Region XI
    • City Governments of Davao, Digos, Island Garden City of Samal, Mati and Tagum
    • Municipalities of Malita (Davao Occidental), Monkayo (Compostela Valley) and Nabunturan (Compostela Valley)
    • Provincial Government of Davao del Sur through Davao del Sur Provincial Hospital
    • Provincial Government of Davao Oriental through Davao Oriental Provincial Medical Center
    • Provincial Government of Davao del Norte through Davao del Norte Provincial Hospital – Samal Zone
    • Provincial Government of Compostela Valley through Compostela Valley Provincial Hospital
    • Davao Regional Hospital
    • Malita District Hospital
    • Southern Philippines Medical Center

    Rebuilding economies after Typhoon Ketsana and strengthening Baras municipality utilities for an inclusive local development

    • Baras Federation of Persons with Disabilities Associations, Inc.
    • Tahanang Walang Hagdanan, Inc.
    • Municipality of Baras, Rizal
    • SEED Center Philippines, Inc.
    • Entrepreneurs du Monde

    Scaling up resilience in governance (SURGE)

    • 3 INGO’s (Christian Aid, Oxfam UK and Plan International)

    Strengthening the capacity of local government units and vulnerable households in inclusive disaster risk reduction (IDRR Project)

    • Alyansa ng may Kapansanang Pinoy (AKAP-PINOY)
    • Catholic Relief Services
    • CBM
    • Center for Disaster Preparedness
    • Coalition of Services of the Elderly (COSE)
    • Disabled Peoples’ Organizations (DPOs)
    • Local Government Units (LGUs)
    • National Council for Disability Affairs (NCDA)
    • National Disaster Risk Reduction Management Council (NDRRMC)
    • Office of Civil Defence (OCD)
    • Norfil Foundation
    • WorldVision