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Nepal

“For thousands of people, the priority now is to rebuild their homes before the monsoon rains begin. They also need to recover their livelihoods so they can earn a living, find another source of income and raise their standard of living again. A year after the disaster, many people still need help, so our teams are continuing their work,” explains Sarah Blin, Handicap International’s director in Nepal."

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“For thousands of people, the priority now is to rebuild their homes before the monsoon rains begin. They also need to recover their livelihoods so they can earn a living, find another source of income and raise their standard of living again. A year after the disaster, many people still need help, so our teams are continuing their work,” explains Sarah Blin, Handicap International’s director in Nepal."
“For thousands of people, the priority now is to rebuild their homes before the monsoon rains begin. They also need to recover their livelihoods so they can earn a living, find another source of income and raise their standard of living again. A year after the disaster, many people still need help, so our teams are continuing their work,” explains Sarah Blin, Handicap International’s director in Nepal."
Sandesh learning to walk again during a rehabilitation session.

Our actions

Handicap International continues to run rehabilitation sessions, distribute orthoses, prostheses and mobility aids, and provide occupational therapy services. To make sure people living in rural areas also benefit from these services, we have deployed 8 mobile rehabilitation units in the west of Nepal. We are also helping to improve the country’s health system. Nearly 200 health professionals in Nepal have been trained in injury and trauma management, and more than 300 caregivers have been provided with information on the benefits of physical rehabilitation.

Handicap International also continues to provide support to the most vulnerable individuals, to ensure they are included in their communities, enjoy a better standard of living and have access to aid supplied by humanitarian organisations. Handicap International places a particular emphasis on making sure their needs are taken into account as the reconstruction gets underway. Handicap International continues to work with local, international stakeholders and the Nepalese authorities to further these aims.

Since Nepal is highly exposed to earthquakes and floods, and many regions are difficult to access in emergencies, Handicap International is continuing to conduct its disaster risk reduction & preparation project. We aim to reduce disaster risks for people living in the centre and west of the country. Handicap International is developing inclusion models for the most vulnerable individuals to promote risk preparation in communities and the setting up of flood early warning systems. We have trained 280 members of local committees to ensure the needs of the most vulnerable people are taken into account as part of disaster preparation activities.

Handicap International is also continuing to prepare health staff for a major earthquake, by training them to treat large numbers of casualties in hospitals in Kathmandu Valley.

The earthquake that hit Nepal on 25th April 2015 killed 8,000 people and injured more than 22,000. Thanks to its experience in the care management of earthquake victims, Handicap International was able to take immediate action to help people affected by the disaster. To date, the organisation has:

  • Provided rehabilitation care in 7 districts across 20 hospitals, 12 health centres, 11 stepdown facilities, 3 focal points and 34 mobile camps, as well as doing home visits.
  • Provided more than 16,000 rehabilitation and psychological support sessions for 6,231 patients.
  • Distributed 4,727 mobility aids such as wheelchairs, crutches and walking frames to injured and disabled people.
  • Set up a hotline to inform people about the organisation's rehabilitation services.
  • Distributed over 4,300 kits containing essential non-food items (e.g.: tents, cooking kits and blankets) and roofing equipment to protect homes from the monsoon for more than 2,200 families.
  • Managed one of two humanitarian aid storage centres in Kathmandu and four districts, storing more than 5,400 tonnes of equipment and transporting aid for 37 organisations.
  • Handed out winter kits to more than 9,000 people.

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Change a life

Background

Nepal, the poorest country in Asia, is highly vulnerable to earthquakes.

The earthquake which hit Nepal on 25 April 2015 killed more than 8,000 people and injured 22,000. Nepal, a country which is highly exposed to the risk of seismic activity, in particular in the valley of Kathmandu, prepares itself for these disasters.

Over 40% of the population lives below the poverty line. The livelihoods of three-quarters of the population depend on agriculture. Its economic development was hindered by the conflict between the government authorities and Maoist insurgents (1996-2006), who are today integrated into the democratic process. This conflict left 12,000 dead and displaced hundreds of thousands of people. It also left many veterans of the war with disabilities. Today the country is working towards democracy and is in a period of relative stability.

In Nepal, disability is primarily considered a social issue. It is rarely addressed as a public health issue or taken into account in education, health and economic development. An estimated 78% of people with disabilities are not in education (Barriga, 2011) and only 1% of the population with disabilities in Nepal has access to employment.

Key figures Nepal - Handicap International
Key figures Nepal - Handicap International
WHERE your support HELPS

Partners

  • Strengthening rehabilitation in district environments

    • Community Based Rehabilitation, Biratnagar (CBRB), Morang district, eastern region
    • National Disabled Fund (NDF), Katmandu district, central region
    • Prerana, Sarlahi district, central region-south
    • Nepalgunj Medical College (NGMC), Banke district, mid-western region
    • Nepal National Social Welfare Association (NNSWA), Kanchanpur district, far western region

    Inclusive Livelihoods

    • Community Based Rehabilitation, Biratnagar (CBRB), Morang district, eastern region
    • HomeNet, Katmandou district, central region
    • Disabled Empowerment and Communication Center Nepal (DEC-N), Banke district, mid-western region;
    • Nepal National Social Welfare Association (NNSWA, Kanchanpur district, far western region

    Community based disaster risk management

    • Nepal Forum for Human Rights and Disabled, Dang district
    • Nepal National Social Welfare Association, Kanchanpur district

    Earthquake preparedness project

    • National Disabled Fund (NDF), Kathmandu, central region.